Counseling

The Twice-Exceptional Adult, by Dr. Dan Peters

Posted on Nov 16, 2015 in Assessments, Counseling, Giftedness, Parenting

The Twice-Exceptional Adult, by Dr. Dan Peters

This piece originally appeared on Psychology Today. Many gifted adults may find that they are still suffering from experiences and challenges that affected them as children. Others find they are experiencing new challenges related to finding their passion, identity, parenting, relationships, career, and more. Summit Center provides a broad range of services for gifted adults, including consultation, testing, counseling, and more. Although the word “gifted” has been used to describe people of higher levels of intelligence for decades, the term twice-exceptional, often abbreviated as 2e,...

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Developing Self Esteem in Gifted Teens, by Melanie Brown Kroon, LMFT

Posted on Aug 18, 2015 in Counseling, Giftedness, Parenting

Developing Self Esteem in Gifted Teens, by Melanie Brown Kroon, LMFT

Melanie Brown Kroon, MA, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, provides therapy and consultations at Summit Center’s Encino office. Melanie works with individuals, couples and families specializing in the emotional needs of gifted and creative adults, adolescents and children. She has written for MSN Health and Fitness and THE THERAPIST Magazine, and she has lectured on topics such as “Talking and Listening to Your Kids” and “How to Teach Self Discipline to Children.” Adolescence is difficult for everyone, but it can be incredibly difficult for gifted kids. To understand why,...

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A Strength-Based Approach Helps Children, by Dr. Dan Peters

Posted on Apr 20, 2015 in Assessments, Counseling, Education, Giftedness, Parenting

A Strength-Based Approach Helps Children, by Dr. Dan Peters

Learn to ask “What’s Right” instead of “What’s Wrong” When it comes to helping our children learn and develop academically, socially, and emotionally, we want them to feel confident about who they are. At Summit Center, we use a strengths-based approach for assessments, counseling, and treatment versus a more traditional pathologizing model. If we look at the medical model of disease as a metaphor we can see that it is grounded in finding pathology, and getting rid of that pathogen to regain physical or mental health. This model is also used when learning problems...

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My Child Won’t Go to School: School Avoidance and What to Do, by Dr. Dan Peters

Posted on Mar 24, 2015 in Assessments, Counseling, Education, Parenting

My Child Won’t Go to School: School Avoidance and What to Do, by Dr. Dan Peters

This piece originally appeared on Huffington Post. “I am not sure what has changed. Things were fine last year and now he wakes up with a stomachache and says he doesn’t want to go to school. It takes me forever to get him out the door. We are often late. He ends up screaming at me and telling me I am the worst parent ever! I end up yelling at him and almost have to pull him out of the car. He leaves upset and I feel upset, worried, and angry. Why is this happening!?” If it sounds like I was in your car this morning, that is because this situation is very common with...

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Just Like Flossing: 5 Ways to Improve Your Study Habits, by Deanna Kim, M.Ed.

Posted on Feb 9, 2015 in Counseling, Education, Parenting

Just Like Flossing: 5 Ways to Improve Your Study Habits, by Deanna Kim, M.Ed.

Deanna Kim is an educational therapist at Summit Center Walnut Creek and at the Athenian School in Danville, where she coaches students in executive functioning to improve T.O.P. skills (Time Management, Organization, and Planning). Deanna is offering a Summit Center webinar on Time Management on August 30. Register Here If you would like more in-depth and personalized coaching with Deanna, please call (925) 939-7500 or email info@summitcenter.us to schedule an appointment. Have you ever crammed the day before seeing a...

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Balancing Social Media and Screen Time, by Dr. John Aldava

Posted on Jan 20, 2015 in Counseling, Parenting

Balancing Social Media and Screen Time, by Dr. John Aldava

by John Aldava, PhD. Licensed Psychologist Dr. John Aldava joins Summit Center after over 13 years at Kaiser Walnut Creek working on the Child & Adolescent Family team as a Licensed Clinical Psychologist. Dr. Aldava has past experience with Contra Costa County’s Children’s Mental Health department, and as an instructor at JFK University in graduate psychology. Dr. Aldava is now available to provide counseling and psychotherapy for children, adolescents, adults, and families at Summit Center Walnut Creek. Call (925) 939-7500 or email...

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Media and Technology: The Worry Monster’s Biggest Ally, by Dr. Dan Peters

Posted on Dec 9, 2014 in Counseling, Parenting

Media and Technology: The Worry Monster’s Biggest Ally, by Dr. Dan Peters

Media and technology have changed our lives in many positive ways. Radio brought local and world news, and entertainment to our family rooms. Television brought these things to life, and in color. You no longer needed to go to a show or a movie theatre, as television brought nightly shows, as well as news programs. And then television evolved more with the inception of cable – more channels, more shows, more movies, and more news – all day long. All of a sudden, you could watch the stock market in real time, while listening to analysts talk about economic forecasts. While in college, I...

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Taming Normal Teen Anxiety, by Dr. Dan Peters

Posted on Nov 22, 2014 in Counseling, Parenting

Taming Normal Teen Anxiety, by Dr. Dan Peters

The teenage years increase fears and nerves for both parent and teens. This piece originally appeared on Psychologytoday.com. During childhood, young people typically remember the stages of their lives in time stamps of school years and summer vacations. There is always that one year when summer break ends and the boys come back with deeper “frogs” in their voices having grown a few lengths and the girls come back looking more like women. The onset of the teenage years not only tweaks fears and nerves within parents, but also in teens themselves. Anxiety can be rampant during these...

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Summer Movies and Books May Provide Parallels to Life’s Challenges For Your Kids, by Dr. Dan Peters

Posted on Jul 1, 2014 in Counseling, Creativity, Parenting

Summer Movies and Books May Provide Parallels to Life’s Challenges For Your Kids, by Dr. Dan Peters

Two of this summer’s most popular movies are stories of young people dealing with the harsher challenges of life both through illness and evil. In the popular film The Fault in Our Stars we see two teenagers fall in love while struggling with the chronic disease of cancer. In How to Train a Dragon 2 we see a young hero with a missing leg struggling to save his hometown from a terrifying villain. Both movies deal with very mature subjects and although there is redemption found in each film’s ending, it doesn’t make the journey any less sad and emotional for young film-goers....

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Reflections, Insights, Confessions, and Inspiration on Dyslexia and Talent

Posted on May 13, 2013 in Assessments, Counseling, Education, Parenting

This article first appeared on the Dyslexic Advantage website, a charitable organization founded by Drs. Brock and Fernette Eide, and dedicated to helping those with dyslexia thrive. By Dan Peters, PhD Sitting at the New York/Newark airport, I feel compelled to write. Something my mother and most of my teachers would have never thought I would feel “compelled” to do. Part of the reason is that I don’t need to “write” anymore – I can type or talk my words. But the main reason I feel compelled is to get my thoughts down, sort through them, and share them with...

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